Autumn Newsletter

Written by Kahoomiki on August 1st, 2011

Our autumn newsletter is full of information about our upcoming events. Check it out here.



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Kaho`omiki Newsletter

Written by Kahoomiki on February 25th, 2011

Spring Newsletter 2011 – March Release



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Fun 5 Email Newsletter: October 2009

Written by Kahoomiki on October 9th, 2009

Eating Fresh All Year Round!

By Margaret Wilson

In Hawaii we are incredibly lucky to have fresh, local,delicious, and unique fruits and vegetables available to us all year round! But even in Hawaii different fruits and vegetables have different growing seasons. Buying produce that’s “in season” can save money because it’s more available, plus they taste great.

So how can you find out what’s in season? HMSA has produced a calendar that makes it easy to find out what local fruits and vegetables are in season. Click HERE to see Calendar. You can also find farmer’s markets where you can buy directly from the grower, which is usually less expensive than purchasing from the grocery store. HAWAII FARMERS MARKETS

Mango Papaya Anytime Smoothie

Tools: Blender


Ingredients:

  • ½ Cup Papaya, Diced
  • ½ Cup Mango, Diced
  • 5 Ice cubes (from Ice Cube Tray)
  • ½ Cup Low Fat Milk or Soy Milk
  • 1 Banana
  • 1 Tbsp smooth peanut butter (optional)


**Try adding a handful of spinach. You can’t taste it (really!), but it adds dark leafy greens to your smoothie!

Directions:

Put all ingredients in blender. Blend until smooth, adding water if too thick (I like mine thick). Serve in 2 tall glasses. Yum!

In October, when many parts of the mainland will be frosting over, we’ll still be enjoying fresh produce, especially fruit. Bananas, limes, mangos, oranges, papayas, persimmons, and rambutan are all in peak season this month! I love smoothies for breakfast in the morning, they’re fast, easy, portable and you can get a couple of servings of fruits and vegetables without even thinking about it. Plus it’s cheaper than running through the drive-through. You can also add fresh sliced bananas and mangos to breakfast cereal or yogurt, and half of a papaya with a fresh lemon wedge makes a tasty snack.

Kids might find Rambutan fun to eat with its spiny shell that they can peel off. Just be sure to not feed to kids who are too young (there is a pit!) and wash the fruit before eating.
Here’s one of my favorite smoothie recipes! Serves 2.


Easy and Delicious Whole Wheat Pasta

By Margaret Wilson

Pasta is an easy to make and cost-effective comfort food that appeals to ‘kids’ of all ages. Unfortunately many rich pasta dishes tend to be high in calories in calories and fat. Recently, the Honolulu Advertiser highlighted Chef Rocco DiSpirito’s upcoming recipe book which will include healthier versions of people’s favorite recipes. One of these recipes uses Greek Yogurt and whole wheat pasta to make a “Penne a la Vodka” which cuts down on the fat and calories and boosts the fiber. The recipe, adapted from DiSpirito’s, is made simple by using bottled marinara sauce but you can boost the vegetable content even more by adding a diced tomato and sliced onions!

Penne “a la Vodka”

Ingredients:

  • 1 Onion, cut into thin slices
  • 2 Large Tomatoes, Diced
  • 12 ounces whole-wheat penne
  • 2 1/2 cups marinara sauce
  • 1/4 teaspoon red pepper flakes
  • 7.1-ounce container 2 per cent fat Greek-style yogurt (I used fat free and it worked well)
  • 1 cup chopped fresh basil (Dried works well too, just reduce to 1 – 2 Tablespoons)
  • Salt and ground black pepper
  • 6 tablespoons grated Parmesan cheese



Directions:

Cook pasta according to package directions, about 8 – 10 minutes.

In a large saucepan over medium heat add olive oil and onions. Cook until onions become tender stirring frequently. Add marinara sauce, red pepper flakes and diced tomatoes. Cook over medium heat, stirring occasionally for 5 minutes, the sauce should thicken slightly.

Add half of the greek yogurt to the marinara mixture, stirring constantly until well mixed. Add the rest of the yogurt. Continue to stir until well mixed.

Drain pasta and add to saucepan, mix until pasta is well coated. Season with salt and pepper if necessary. Add basil and top with parmesan cheese.

Bon Appetite!

References:
Associated Press. (2009). Traditional penne dish loses fat, vodka. Retrieved September 18, 2009, from Honolulu Advertiser Web site: http://www.honoluluadvertiser.com


SPARK Newsletter for October

 



Modifying Activities So Everyone Can be Active

Every teacher has students who aren’t able to fully engage in each lesson because of large class sizes, having little or no equipment, or the requirement to compete with more dominant students. However, it is critical all students receive the opportunity to practice movement skills and accumulate enough minutes in MVPA to gain the health benefits.

This month SPARK is providing three strategies to level the playing field:

1) Minimize Lines- Instead of having 3 groups of 10 with a ball, have 10 groups of 3: everyone will have more opportunities to practice and be active. And, give students something to do while in line (e.g., stretches, marching in place, juggling scarfs, hula hooping, etc.)

2) Use Non-Elimination Games- Plan activities that encourage movement and do not eliminate students! For example, in dribble keep away, if your ball is knocked out, you retrieve it and rejoin the game.

3) Everyone is It- In a tag game, use more taggers to ensure everyone is involved, or do a variation where everyone is it! For sports, decrease the number of players in each group and require everyone in the group to gain possession of the ball before a player can attempt to score. For an example of this strategy, see the SPARK activity, “3 Catch Game.” Click Here for the 3 Catch Game Lesson Plan.

This month we’re pleased to feature Dana Chambers, an elementary physical education specialist from Newcastle Elementary (418 NW 10th) school in Newcastle, Oklahoma.
In her own words:

“I recently attended the K-2 and the 3-6 institute in July… I am now in my fourth week of school and completely loving SPARK. I love the quick transitions I am able to implement. My students are loving it too. Our favorite activity so far has been Superhero tag (fyi- all grades have loved it even though it was just in the K-2). I am amazed at how just changing a few things like always saying ‘When I say Go, we will do this’…

Anyways you had asked for feedback when we were there and I just wanted to let you know how much it is impacting my teaching.”

Want to share your thoughts about SPARK? Click Here and submit your own testimonial. If we feature it in our eNewsletter, we’ll send you a SPARK t-shirt!

Featured Product:

This month Sportime is proud to feature the CorePole, a complete Cardio and Strength Conditioning System! The CorePole simultaneously accommodates up to 10 users and is a great way to improve the fitness levels of your students! Click Here for information on the CorePole and to see a video of it in action!

Did you know you can purchase all of your favorite quality Sportime equipment through SPARK? Contact SPARK to order today! 800-SPARK-PE or spark@sparkpe.org

Featured Article:

SUUNTO and HeartZones Team Pod Heart Rate Monitoring System from Sportime
(Reprinted from The Osawatomie Graphic)

Get pumped up!

Not only have physical education teachers in USD 367 (Oswatomie, KS) put into place a one-of-a-kind district physical education program, but they became a real department instead of six individuals working in separate locations and on differing schedules…

Click Here to read the rest of this article…

You can now follow SPARK through your favorite social media sites! Are you on Facebook? Become a fan of The SPARK Programs! Like to Tweet? Follow SPARK on Twitter! Looking for discussions on interesting health-related topics? Subscribe the the SPARK Blog!

Join SPARK through any of these sites and you’ll be able to:

  • Get updated on the latest SPARK resources and events
  • See what other SPARK Stars are doing & saying
  • Let SPARK and the SPARK family know what you think
  • Connect with other educators/organizations in our industry

Click on any icon below to visit the SPARK account for that site…

Institutetwitter gifblogger gif

 

 



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Fun 5 Email Newsletter: September 2009

Written by Kahoomiki on September 3rd, 2009

Attention A+ Sites

 

The 2009 Fall Fun 5 Trainings will begin 09/12/09.

Please check the following list for your School’s information.

Would you like to REGISTER for the 2009 Fall Fun 5 Trainings?

Email your name and School to Paula Adams, the Fun 5 Program Manager, at padams@kahoomiki.org.

If you would like to learn more about Kaho‘omiki and Fun 5, please visit our website at http://kahoomiki.org/

School

Date

Time

Location

Address

Ahuimanu Elem. Sch.

Sat., 10/24/09

8 am- 12 pm

Kaneohe Elem. Sch.

45-495 Kamehameha Highway, Kaneohe

Aiea Elem. Sch.

Sat., 09/26/09

8 am- 12 pm

Red Hill Elem. Sch.

1265 Ala Kula Place, Honolulu

Aikahi Elem. Sch.

Sat., 10/24/09

8 am- 12 pm

Kaneohe Elem. Sch.

45-495 Kamehameha Highway, Kaneohe

Aina Haina Elem. Sch.

Sat., 09/19/09

8 am- 12 pm

TBA

Ala Wai Elem. Sch.

Sat., 09/26/09

8 am- 12 pm

TBA

Aliamanu Elem. Sch.

Sat., 09/26/09

8 am- 12 pm

Red Hill Elem. Sch.

1265 Ala Kula Place, Honolulu

Aliiolani Elem. Sch.

Sat., 09/19/09

8 am- 12 pm

TBA

August Ahrens Elem. Sch.

Sat., 09/19/09

8 am- 12 pm

Ewa Beach Sch.

91-740 Papipi Rd, Ewa Beach

Barbers Point Elem. Sch.

Sat., 09/19/09

8 am- 12 pm

Ewa Beach Sch.

91-740 Papipi Rd, Ewa Beach

Connections New Century (PCS)

Sat., 09/12/09

8 am- 12 pm

Hilo Intermediate Sch.

587 Waianuenue Avenue, Hilo

DeSilva Elem. Sch.

Sat., 09/12/09

8 am- 12 pm

Hilo Intermediate Sch.

587 Waianuenue Avenue, Hilo

Eleele Elem. Sch.

Sat., 09/12/09

8 am- 12 pm

Kalaheo Elem. Sch.

4400 Maka Rd, Kalaheo

Enchanted Lake Elem. Sch.

Sat., 10/24/09

8 am- 12 pm

Maunawili Elem. Sch.

1465 Ulupii Street, Kailua

Ewa Beach Elem. Sch.

Sat., 09/19/09

8 am- 12 pm

Ewa Beach Sch.

91-740 Papipi Rd, Ewa Beach

Ewa Elem. Sch.

Sat., 09/19/09

8 am- 12 pm

Ewa Beach Sch.

91-740 Papipi Rd, Ewa Beach

Fern Elem. Sch.

Sat., 09/26/09

8 am- 12 pm

Red Hill Elem. Sch.

1265 Ala Kula Place, Honolulu

Ha’aheo Elem. Sch.

Sat., 09/12/09

8 am- 12 pm

Hilo Intermediate Sch.

587 Waianuenue Avenue, Hilo

Hale Kula Elem. Sch.

Sat., 10/17/09

8 am- 12 pm

TBA

Haleiwa Elem. Sch.

Sat., 10/17/09

8 am- 12 pm

Helemano Elem. Sch.

1001 Ihi Ihi Avenue, Wahiawa

Hana High Elem.

Sat., 10/24/09

8 am- 12 pm

Wailuku Elem. Sch.

355 S. High Street, Wailuku

Hanalei Elem. Sch.

Sat., 09/19/09

8 am- 12 pm

Kapaa Elem. Sch.

4886 Kawaihau Rd, Kapaa

Hauula Elem. Sch.

Sat., 10/24/09

8 am- 12 pm

Kaneohe Elem. Sch.

45-495 Kamehameha Highway, Kaneohe

Heeia Elem. Sch.

Sat., 10/24/09

8 am- 12 pm

Kaneohe Elem. Sch.

45-495 Kamehameha Highway, Kaneohe

Helemano Elem. Sch.

Sat., 10/17/09

8 am- 12 pm

Helemano Elem. Sch.

1001 Ihi Ihi Avenue, Wahiawa

Hickam Elem. Sch.

Sat., 09/26/09

8 am- 12 pm

PEACHES (Pearl City Highlands El)

1419 Waimano Home Road, Pearl City

Hilo Union Elem. Sch.

Sat., 09/12/09

8 am- 12 pm

Hilo Intermediate Sch.

587 Waianuenue Avenue, Hilo

Hokulani Elem. Sch.

Sat., 09/26/09

8 am- 12 pm

TBA

Holomua Elem. Sch.

Sat., 09/19/09

8 am- 12 pm

Ewa Beach Sch.

91-740 Papipi Rd, Ewa Beach

Holualoa Elem. Sch.

Thu., 09/17/09

8 am- 12 pm

Kealakehe Elem. Sch.

74-5118 Kealakaa Street, Kailua Kona

Honaunau Elem. Sch.

Thu., 09/17/09

8 am- 12 pm

Kealakehe Elem. Sch.

74-5118 Kealakaa Street, Kailua Kona

Honoka’a Elem. Sch.

Sat., 09/12/09

8 am- 12 pm

Hilo ntermediate Sch.

587 Waianuenue Avenue, Hilo

Honowai Elem. Sch.

Sat., 09/19/09

8 am- 12 pm

Ewa Beach Sch.

91-740 Papipi Rd, Ewa Beach

Hookena Elem. Sch.

Thu., 09/17/09

8 am- 12 pm

Kealakehe Elem. Sch.

74-5118 Kealakaa Street, Kailua Kona

Iliahi Elem. Sch.

Sat., 10/17/09

8 am- 12 pm

Helemano Elem. Sch.

1001 Ihi Ihi Avenue, Wahiawa

Innovations Charter Sch.(PCS)

Thu., 09/17/09

8 am- 12 pm

Kealakehe Elem. Sch.

74-5118 Kealakaa Street, Kailua Kona

Iroquois Point Elem. Sch.

Sat., 09/19/09

8 am- 12 pm

Ewa Beach Sch.

91-740 Papipi Rd, Ewa Beach

Kaaawa Elem. Sch.

Sat., 10/24/09

8 am- 12 pm

Kaneohe Elem. Sch.

45-495 Kamehameha Highway, Kaneohe

Kaala Elem. Sch.

Sat., 10/17/09

8 am- 12 pm

TBA

Kaelepulu Elem. Sch.

Sat., 10/24/09

8 am- 12 pm

Maunawili Elem. Sch.

1465 Ulupii Street, Kailua

Kaewai Elem. Sch.

Sat., 09/26/09

8 am- 12 pm

Red Hill Elem. Sch.

1265 Ala Kula Place, Honolulu

Kahakai Elem. Sch.

Thu., 09/17/09

8 am- 12 pm

Kealakehe Elem. Sch.

74-5118 Kealakaa Street, Kailua Kona

Kahala Elem. Sch.

Sat., 09/19/09

8 am- 12 pm

TBA

Kahaluu Elem. Sch.

Sat., 10/24/09

8 am- 12 pm

Kaneohe Elem. Sch.

45-495 Kamehameha Highway, Kaneohe

Kahuku Elem. Sch.

Sat., 10/24/09

8 am- 12 pm

Kaneohe Elem. Sch.

45-495 Kamehameha Highway, Kaneohe

Kahului Elem. Sch.

Sat., 10/24/09

8 am- 12 pm

Wailuku Elem. Sch.

355 S. High Street, Wailuku

Kailua Elem. Sch.

Sat., 10/24/09

8 am- 12 pm

Maunawili Elem. Sch.

1465 Ulupii Street, Kailua

Kaimiloa Elem. Sch.

Sat., 09/19/09

8 am- 12 pm

Ewa Beach Sch.

91-740 Papipi Rd, Ewa Beach

Kainalu Elem. Sch.

Sat., 10/24/09

8 am- 12 pm

Maunawili Elem. Sch.

1465 Ulupii Street, Kailua

Kalaheo Elem. Sch.

Sat., 09/12/09

8 am- 12 pm

Kalaheo Elem. Sch.

4400 Maka Rd, Kalaheo

Kalanianaole Elem. Sch.

Sat., 09/12/09

8 am- 12 pm

Hilo Intermediate Sch.

587 Waianuenue Avenue, Hilo

Kaleiopuu Elem. Sch.

Sat., 09/26/09

8 am- 12 pm

PEACHES (Pearl City Highlands El)

1419 Waimano Home Road, Pearl City

Kalihi Elem. Sch.

Sat., 09/26/09

8 am- 12 pm

TBA

Kalihiwaena Elem. Sch.

Sat., 09/26/09

8 am- 12 pm

TBA

Kamaile Elem. Sch. (PCS)

Sat., 09/26/09

8 am- 12 pm

PEACHES (Pearl City Highlands El)

1419 Waimano Home Road, Pearl City

Kamalii Elem. Sch.

Sat., 10/24/09

8 am- 12 pm

Wailuku Elem. Sch.

355 S. High Street, Wailuku

Kamehameha HS After Sch. Program

Sat., 09/26/09

8 am- 12 pm

TBA

Kaneohe Elem. Sch.

Sat., 10/24/09

8 am- 12 pm

Kaneohe Elem. Sch.

45-495 Kamehameha Highway, Kaneohe

Kanoelani Elem. Sch.

Sat., 10/17/09

8 am- 12 pm

TBA

Kapaa Elem. Sch.

Sat., 09/19/09

8 am- 12 pm

Kapaa Elem. Sch.

4886 Kawaihau Rd, Kapaa

Kapi’olani Elem. Sch.

Sat., 09/12/09

8 am- 12 pm

Hilo Intermediate Sch.

587 Waianuenue Avenue, Hilo

Kapolei Elem. Sch.

Sat., 09/19/09

8 am- 12 pm

Ewa Beach Sch.

91-740 Papipi Rd, Ewa Beach

Kapunahala Elem. Sch.

Sat., 10/24/09

8 am- 12 pm

Maunawili Elem. Sch.

1465 Ulupii Street, Kailua

Ka’u High Pahala Elem. Sch.

Sat., 09/12/09

8 am- 12 pm

Hilo Intermediate Sch.

587 Waianuenue Avenue, Hilo

Kauluwela lem. Sch.

Sat., 09/19/09

8 am- 12 pm

TBA

Kaumana Elem. Sch.

Sat., 09/12/09

8 am- 12 pm

Hilo Intermediate Sch.

587 Waianuenue Avenue, Hilo

Kaunakakai Elem. Sch.

Sat., 10/24/09

8 am- 12 pm

Wailuku Elem. Sch.

355 S. High Street, Wailuku

Keaau Elem. Sch.

Sat., 09/12/09

8 am- 12 pm

Hilo Intermediate Sch.

587 Waianuenue Avenue, Hilo

Kealakehe Elem. Sch.

Thu., 09/17/09

8 am- 12 pm

Kealakehe Elem. Sch.

74-5118 Kealakaa Street, Kailua Kona

Keaukaha Elem. Sch.

Sat., 09/12/09

8 am- 12 pm

Hilo Intermediate Sch.

587 Waianuenue Avenue, Hilo

Kekaha Elem. Sch.

Sat., 09/12/09

8 am- 12 pm

Kalaheo Elem. Sch.

4400 Maka Rd, Kalaheo

Keolu Elem. Sch.

Sat., 10/24/09

8 am- 12 pm

Maunawili lem. Sch.

1465 Ulupii Street, Kailua

Keonepoko Elem. Sch.

Sat., 09/12/09

8 am- 12 pm

Hilo Intermediate Sch.

587 Waianuenue Avenue, Hilo

Keone’ula Elem. Sch.

Sat.,
09/19/09

8 am- 12 pm

Ewa Beach Sch.

91-740 Papipi Rd, Ewa Beach

Kilauea Elem. Sch.

Sat., 09/19/09

8 am- 12 pm

Kapaa Elem. Sch.

4886
Kawaihau Rd, Kapaa

Kilohana Elem. Sch.

Sat., 10/24/09

8 am- 12 pm

Wailuku Elem. Sch.

355 S. High Street, Wailuku

King Kamehameha III Elem.

Sat., 10/24/09

8 am- 12 pm

Wailuku Elem. Sch.

355 S. High Street, Wailuku

King Kaumualii Elem. Sch.

Sat., 09/19/09

8 am- 12 pm

Kapaa Elem. Sch.

4886 Kawaihau Rd, Kapaa

Kipapa Elem. Sch.

Sat., 10/17/09

8 am- 12 pm

TBA

Kohala Elem. Sch.

Thu., 09/17/09

8 am- 12 pm

Kealakehe Elem. Sch.

74-5118 Kealakaa Street, Kailua Kona

Koko Head Elem. Sch.

Sat., 09/26/09

8 am- 12 pm

TBA

Koloa Elem. Sch.

Sat., 09/12/09

8 am- 12 pm

Kalaheo Elem. Sch.

4400 Maka Rd, Kalaheo

Konawaena Elem. Sch.

Thu., 09/17/09

8 am- 12 pm

Kealakehe Elem. Sch.

74-5118 Kealakaa Street, Kailua Kona

Kuhio Elem. Sch.

Sat., 09/19/09

8 am- 12 pm

TBA

Kula Elem. Sch.

Sat., 10/24/09

8 am- 12 pm

Wailuku Elem. Sch.

355 S. High Street, Wailuku

Laie Elem. Sch.

Sat., 10/24/09

8 am- 12 pm

Kaneohe Elem. Sch.

45-495 Kamehameha Highway, Kaneohe

Lanakila Elem. Sch.

Sat., 09/26/09

8 am- 12 pm

Red Hill Elem. Sch.

1265 Ala Kula Place, Honolulu

Lanikai Elem. Sch. (PCS)

Sat., 10/24/09

8 am- 12 pm

Maunawili Elem. Sch.

1465 Ulupii Street, Kailua

Laupahoehoe High Elem. Sch.

Sat., 09/12/09

8 am- 12 pm

Hilo Intermediate Sch.

587 Waianuenue Avenue, Hilo

Lehua Elem. Sch.

Sat., 10/17/09

8 am- 12 pm

TBA

Leihoku Elem. Sch.

Sat., 09/19/09

8 am- 12 pm

Ewa Beach Sch.

91-740 Papipi Rd, Ewa Beach

Liholiho Elem. Sch.

Sat., 09/26/09

8 am- 12 pm

TBA

Liliuokalani Elem. Sch.

Sat., 09/19/09

8 am- 12 pm

TBA

Lincoln Elem. Sch.

Sat., 09/19/09

8 am- 12 pm

TBA

Maemae Elem. Sch.

Sat., 09/19/09

8 am- 12 pm

TBA

Maili Elem. Sch.

Sat., 09/26/09

8 am- 12 pm

PEACHES (Pearl City Highlands El)

1419 Waimano Home Road, Pearl City

Makaha Elem. Sch.

Sat., 09/19/09

8 am- 12 pm

Ewa Beach Sch.

91-740 Papipi Rd, Ewa Beach

Makakilo Elem. Sch.

Sat., 09/19/09

8 am- 12 pm

Ewa Beach Sch.

91-740 Papipi Rd, Ewa Beach

Makalapa Elem. Sch.

Sat., 09/26/09

8 am- 12 pm

Red Hill Elem. Sch.

1265 Ala Kula Place, Honolulu

Makawao Elem. Sch.

Sat., 10/24/09

8 am- 12 pm

Wailuku Elem. Sch.

355 S. High Street, Wailuku

Manana Elem. Sch.

Sat., 10/17/09

8 am- 12 pm

TBA

Mauka Lani Elem. Sch.

Sat., 09/19/09

8 am- 12 pm

Ewa Beach Sch.

91-740 Papipi Rd, Ewa Beach

Maunawili Elem. Sch.

Sat., 10/24/09

8 am- 12 pm

Maunawili Elem. Sch.

1465 Ulupii Street, Kailua

Mililani Ike Elem. Sch.

Sat., 10/17/09

8 am- 12 pm

TBA

Mililani Kids Clubhouse

Sat., 10/17/09

8 am- 12 pm

Helemano Elem. Sch.

1001 hi Ihi Avenue, Wahiawa

Mililani Mauka Elem. Sch.

Sat., 10/17/09

8 am- 12 pm

TBA

Mililani Uka Elem. Sch.

Sat., 10/17/09

8 am- 12 pm

TBA

Mililani Waena Elem. Sch.

Sat., 10/17/09

8 am- 12 pm

Helemano Elem. Sch.

1001 Ihi Ihi Avenue, Wahiawa

Moanalua Elem. Sch.

Sat., 09/26/09

8 am- 12 pm

Red Hill Elem. Sch.

1265 Ala Kula Place, Honolulu

Mokapu Elem. Sch.

Sat., 10/24/09

8 am- 12 pm

Kaneohe Elem. Sch.

45-495 Kamehameha Highway, Kaneohe

Mokulele Elem. Sch.

Sat., 09/26/09

8 am- 12 pm

PEACHES (Pearl City Highlands El)

1419 Waimano Home Road, Pearl City

Momilani Elem. Sch.

Sat., 09/26/09

8 am- 12 pm

PEACHES (Pearl City Highlands El)

1419 Waimano Home Road, Pearl City

Mountain View Elem. Sch.

Sat., 09/12/09

8 am- 12 pm

Hilo Intermediate Sch.

587 Waianuenue Avenue, Hilo

Na’alehu Elem. Sch.

Sat., 09/12/09

8 am- 12 pm

Hilo Intermediate Sch.

587 Waianuenue Avenue, Hilo

Nanaikapono Elem. Sch.

Sat., 09/26/09

8 am- 12 pm

PEACHES (Pearl City Highlands El)

1419 Waimano Home Road, Pearl City

Nanakuli Elem. Sch.

Sat., 09/19/09

8 am- 12 pm

Ewa Beach Sch.

91-740 Papipi Rd, Ewa Beach

Nawahiokalani’opu’u El Sch. (PCS)

Sat., 09/12/09

8 am- 12 pm

Hilo Intermediate Sch.

587 Waianuenue Avenue, Hilo

Nimitz Elem. Sch.

Sat., 09/26/09

8 am- 12 pm

PEACHES (Pearl City Highlands El)

1419 Waimano Home Road, Pearl City

Nuuanu Elem. Sch.

Sat., 09/19/09

8 am- 12 pm

TBA

Pa’auilo Elem. Sch. Intermediate

Sat., 09/12/09

8 am- 12 pm

Hilo Intermediate Sch.

587 Waianuenue Avenue, Hilo

Pahoa Elem. Sch.

Sat., 09/12/09

8 am- 12 pm

Hilo Intermediate Sch.

587 Waianuenue Avenue, Hilo

Paia Elem. Sch.

Sat., 10/24/09

8 am- 12 pm

Wailuku Elem. Sch.

355 S. High Street, Wailuku

Palisades Elem. Sch.

Sat., 10/17/09

8 am- 12 pm

TBA

Parker Elem. Sch.

Sat., 10/24/09

8 am- 12 pm

Kaneohe Elem. Sch.

45-495 Kamehameha Highway, Kaneohe

Pauoa Elem. Sch.

Sat., 09/26/09

8 am- 12 pm

TBA

Pearl City Elem. Sch.

Sat., 09/26/09

8 am- 12 pm

PEACHES (Pearl City Highlands El)

1419 Waimano Home Road, Pearl City

Pearl City Highlands El Sch.

Sat., 09/26/09

8 am- 12 pm

PEACHES (Pearl City Highlands El)

1419 Waimano Home Road, Pearl City

Pearl Harbor Elem. Sch.

Sat., 09/26/09

8 am- 12 pm

PEACHES (Pearl City Highlands El)

1419 Waimano Home Road, Pearl City

Pearl Harbor Kai El Sch.

Sat., 09/26/09

8 am- 12 pm

PEACHES (Pearl City Highlands El)

1419 Waimano Home Road, Pearl City

Pearl Ridge Elem. Sch.

Sat., 09/26/09

8 am- 12 pm

Red Hill Elem. Sch.

1265 Ala Kula Place, Honolulu

Pohakea Elem. Sch.

Sat., 09/19/09

8 am- 12 pm

Ewa Beach Sch.

91-740 Papipi Rd, Ewa Beach

Pope Elem. Sch.

Sat., 10/24/09

8 am- 12 pm

Maunawili Elem. Sch.

1465 Ulupii Street, Kailua

Princess Nahienaena Elem. Sch.

Sat., 10/24/09

8 am- 12 pm

Wailuku Elem. Sch.

355 S. High Street, Wailuku

Pukalani Elem. Sch.

Sat., 10/24/09

8 am- 12 pm

Wailuku Elem. Sch.

355 S. High Street, Wailuku

Puohala Elem. Sch.

Sat., 10/24/09

8 am- 12 pm

Kaneohe Elem. Sch.

45-495 Kamehameha Highway, Kaneohe

Puuhale Elem. Sch.

Sat., 09/26/09

8 am- 12 pm

Red Hill Elem. Sch.

1265
Ala Kula Place, Honolulu

Red Hill Elem. Sch.

Sat., 09/26/09

8 am- 12 pm

Red Hill Elem. Sch.

1265 Ala Kula Place, Honolulu

Royal Elem. Sch.

Sat., 09/19/09

8 am- 12 pm

TBA

Salt Lake Elem. Sch.

Sat., 09/26/09

8 am- 12 pm

Red Hill Elem. Sch.

1265 Ala Kula Place, Honolulu

Scott Elem. Sch.

Sat., 09/26/09

8 am- 12 pm

Red Hill Elem. Sch.

1265 Ala Kula Place, Honolulu

Shafter Elem. Sch.

Sat., 09/26/09

8 am- 12 pm

Red Hill Elem. Sch.

1265 Ala Kula Place, Honolulu

Solomon Elem. Sch.

Sat., 10/17/09

8 am- 12 pm

Helemano Elem. Sch.

1001 Ihi Ihi Avenue, Wahiawa

St. Ann’s Model Sch.s

Sat., 10/24/09

8 am- 12 pm

Maunawili Elem. Sch.

1465 Ulupii Street, Kailua

St. Elizabeth Sch. After Sch. Program

Sat., 09/26/09

8 am- 12 pm

TBA

St. Francis After Sch. Program

Sat., 09/26/09

8 am- 12 pm

TBA

St. Theresa Sch. After Sch. Program

Sat., 09/26/09

8 am- 12 pm

TBA

Sunset Beach Elem. Sch.

Sat., 10/17/09

8 am- 12 pm

Helemano Elem. Sch.

1001 Ihi Ihi Avenue, Wahiawa

Volcano Sch. Art/Science PCS

Sat., 09/12/09

8 am- 12 pm

Hilo Intermediate Sch.

587 Waianuenue Avenue, Hilo

Voyager Elem. Sch. (PCS)/Laniakea

Sat., 09/26/09

8 am- 12 pm

TBA

Wahiawa Elem. Sch.

Sat., 10/17/09

8 am- 12 pm

TBA

Waiahole Elem. Sch.

Sat., 10/24/09

8 am- 12 pm

Kaneohe Elem. Sch.

45-495 Kamehameha Highway, Kaneohe

Waiakea Elem. Sch.

Sat., 09/12/09

8 am- 12 pm

Hilo Intermediate Sch.

587 Waianuenue Avenue, Hilo

Waiakeawaena El Sch.

Sat., 09/12/09

8 am- 12 pm

Hilo Intermediate Sch.

587 Waianuenue Avenue, Hilo

Waialua Elem. Sch.

Sat., 10/17/09

8 am- 12 pm

Helemano Elem. Sch.

1001 Ihi Ihi Avenue, Wahiawa

Waianae Elem. Sch.

Sat., 09/26/09

8 am- 12 pm

PEACHES (Pearl City Highlands El)

1419 Waimano Home Road, Pearl City

Waiau Elem. Sch.

Sat., 10/17/09

8 am- 12 pm

TBA

Waihee Elem.

Sat., 10/24/09

8 am- 12 pm

Wailuku Elem. Sch.

355 S. High Street, Wailuku

Waikele Elem. Sch.

Sat., 09/19/09

8 am- 12 pm

Ewa Beach Sch.

91-740 Papipi Rd, Ewa Beach

Waikoloa Elem. Sch.

Thu., 09/17/09

8 am- 12 pm

Kealakehe Elem. Sch.

74-5118 Kealakaa Street, Kailua Kona

Wailuku Elem. Sch.

Sat., 10/24/09

8 am- 12 pm

Wailuku Elem. Sch.

355 S. High Street, Wailuku

Wailup Valley El Sch.

Sat., 09/19/09

8 am- 12 pm

Location TBA

Waimalu Elem. Sch.

Sat., 09/26/09

8 am- 12 pm

Red Hill Elem. Sch.

1265 Ala Kula Place, Honolulu

Waimanalo Elem. Sch.

Sat., 10/24/09

8 am- 12 pm

Maunawili Elem. Sch.

1465 Ulupii Street, Kailua

Waimea Elem. Sch.

Thu., 09/17/09

8 am- 12 pm

Kealakehe Elem. Sch.

74-5118 Kealakaa Street, Kailua Kona

Waipahu Elem. Sch.

Sat., 09/19/09

8 am- 12 pm

Ewa Beach Sch.

91-740 Papipi Rd, Ewa Beach

Webling Gus Elem. Sch.

Sat., 09/26/09

8 am- 12 pm

Red Hill Elem. Sch.

1265 Ala Kula Place, Honolulu

Wheeler Elem. Sch.

Sat., 10/17/09

8 am- 12 pm

Helemano Elem. Sch.

1001 Ihi Ihi Avenue, Wahiawa

Wilcox Elem. Sch.

Sat., 09/12/09

8 am- 12 pm

Kalaheo Elem. Sch.

4400 Maka Rd, Kalaheo


Oatmeal: the perfect base to create variety, moderation, and taste

By Jonathan Valdez

Oatmeal is a perfect meal at any time and occasion: morning, lunch, dinner, or snack. It can be a base for a plethora of other ingredients such as oils, fruits, and dairy. Here is an example of a recipe that you could work with:

* 1/4 cup quick cooking oats

* 1/2 cup skim milk

* 1 teaspoon flax seeds

* 2 tablespoons chopped walnuts

* 3 tablespoons honey

* 1 banana, peeled

 

Combine the oats, milk, flax seeds, walnuts, honey, and banana in a microwave-safe bowl. Cook in microwave on High for 2 minutes. Mash the banana with a fork and stir into the mixture. Serve hot.

With these ingredients you may consume the following: calcium, fiber, carbohydrates, omega-3 fatty acid, omega-6 fatty acid, and potassium.

By adding other fruits, oils, and nuts such as strawberries, blueberries, kiwi, almonds, peanuts, vegetable oil, sunflower oil, etc. you can add a variety of minerals and vitamins, moderation, and health to your diet.

Substitute skim milk with soymilk if you are lactose intolerant, or allergic to animal protein. Soymilk may also be more nutrient dense due to fortification.

Please be warned that all products differ in the amount of nutrients that are available. Reading food labels is crucial in order to see what you are consuming and how much you are consuming. Other then that please enjoy this easy to make and bake item.

Reference:
USDA National Nutrient Database
Recipe:
allrecipes.com

Image:
imgslide.health.com


A Planted environment may cause stress relief

By Jonathan Valdez

When people think of health, in most instances, food, diet, and exercise and how it will make us lose or gain weight are immediate brain responses. However, health is more than a physical state of mind. Mentality, more specifically levels of stress, plays an important role in good health. Stress may cause an array of different effects for different people with some of the following symptoms: over-eating, not eating, headaches, irritability, lack of sleep, high blood pressure, and more.

One aspect that has some research for promoting a healthy mind is human interaction with nature. The Ottawa Charter under the World Health Organization and Australian Institute of Health and Welfare promotes eco-system balance in humans for good health.

The view or access to nature via vegetation, animals, rocks, water, and other sources may have positive affects for health by decreasing stress. In a few studies, greater job satisfaction was viewed when nature was seen in the workplace (Kaplan, Rachel, 1993; Ulrich, 1991).

Hawaii is a perfect place to view sceneries. Trails.com gives you a choice of what island you are on and what type of activity you want to do outdoors: mountain biking, road biking, walking, hiking, surfing, and scenic drives. Other options of natural views are kayaking, sailing, kite surfing, site seeing, etc. Some of these activities will allow you to have contact with nature.

In your household and work place, plants or opening up your curtains to view the outdoors are great ways to be contact with nature. Doityourself and fitsugar have some ideas how you can develop your house into a stress-relieving powerhouse.

Relieving stress is just one aspect of good health. A low stress level isn’t a cure to disease and not the only option that leads to good health. Proper eating habits and exercise are vital components of good health and preventative actions from disease. By using plants, you may be one step closer to brighter outlook on your job and household. This in turn may allow you to be a step closer to eating healthier and undergoing physical activity.

References:
Kaplan, Rachel (1993/10).”The role of nature in the context of the workplace.” Landscape and Urban Planning 26(1-4): 193-201
ULRICH, Roger S. (1991), “Stress Recovery During Exposure to Natural and Urban Environments” Journal of Environmental Psychology 11,201-230

Image:
Botanical Environments


Obesity Dollars and Sense

By Paul Rosengard

Its swimsuit season — that time of year when people assess the way the look with fewer clothes on — and maybe, resolve to make some changes.

Whatever the motivator to shed fat/lose weight, statistics show there is surely a need for Americans to take a long look in the mirror. A recent USA Today front page article titled, “Obesity is a key link to soaring health tab” said that about 40% of adults — more than 72 million — were obese in 2006; up from 23% in 1994. And, 2/3 of everyone in the US is overweight or obese. I can almost hear the Europeans chuckling at us…

While many of us judge our bodies by how they look in a bathing suit at the beach, the article goes beyond skin deep. It reports that the cost of healthcare has doubled to $147 billion in a decade, and obesity accounts for almost 10% of that total.

Eric Finkelstein, a health economist says,

“If you really want to rein in healthcare dollars, you have to get people dieting, exercising and living a healthier lifestyle.”

Alright, we get it. The message isn’t new — it’s just that the statistics are getting worse and the unfortunate result is obesity is costing us more. People KNOW they are overweight and many want to drop some unhealthy fat and be more active, but it’s harder than just shouting from the rooftops, “Eat less and move more!” If changing behavior were that easy, we wouldn’t be in this predicament.

Here are a few tips for personal change that are less commonly known:

1. Call in a Substitute. Take one thing you consume every day (e.g., coffee creamer) and go from full fat to no fat. This little change done frequently adds up. Once you’ve made one small change, add another. Rinse and repeat.

2. Take 10: After dinner or anytime, go for a 5 minute walk (always consult your Doctor before beginning any exercise regimen). Five minutes in one direction, then turn around and head back. These 10 minutes — most if not all days of the week — will kick-start your activity program. Build from this foundation by increasing your frequency (how many times a week you walk) and duration (how long you walk). And check out a previous blog spot where I talk about how our dog Scout has helped my wife Wendy become a daily walker — after work.

3. Tell a Friend: Ask someone you know to be your health coach. Encourage you to eat regular size portions — and try and eat smaller meals 4-5 times a day, instead of 3 big ones. More frequent eating helps regulate your blood sugar, keeps you from getting hungry, and fires up your metabolism. Use that friend for support (e.g., an exercise buddy). By the way, my wife Wendy does this for an optimal health program called Take Shape for Life (www.spreadyourwings.tsfl.com). It works, people lose weight and keep it off, and I highly recommend it!

While personal responsibility is by far the main factor in weight management — our communities can play a role — positive or negative. From the USA Today article, here are 6 steps communities can take to help prevent obesity:

1. Put schools within easy walking distance of residential areas.
2. Improve access to outdoor recreational facilities.
3. REQUIRE PHYSICAL EDUCATION IN SCHOOLS — YEA!
4. Enhance traffic safety in areas where people could be physically active.
5. Enhance infrastructure supporting walking and biking.
6. Discourage consumption of sugar-sweetened drinks.

So, if you haven’t had that long, self-assessment look in the mirror yet this summer, maybe it’s time. Ultimately, it’s up to each of us to be in control of our own healthy lifestyle. If we don’t, healthcare costs will take control of us.


It’s About Professional Growth

This was a great week of the year for all of us at SPARK. We just finished hosting our K-2 and 3-6 physical education Institutes and meeting approximately 100 passionate educators from around the globe. Since 1995, SPARK has been facilitating these professional growth opportunities for individuals whose districts are either too small, too poor, or too poorly prioritized to bring a SPARK trainer to them. Institutes provide the opportunity for people to come to SPARK — and we love it.

While we do our best to limit each program focus to the first 40 people to register, we usually invite a number of special guests to observe, and they may swell our numbers to 50 or more. This year, we entertained people from India, China, Canada, Australia and myriad cities and towns across the U.S. Personally, I think learning about physical education in other countries is fascinating. For example, in China, children start preschool at age 3 and don’t begin at the elementary school until age 6 or 7 — missing what we call Kindergarten, and beginning in first grade. In India, almost everyone speaks English, and our SPARK books don’t have to be translated for teachers there. What we refer to as Standards in the U.S., are known as Outcomes in Canada. And Canadian funding for education comes only from provincial money, not from the federal government, therefore, each province writes their own outcomes. By the way, SPARK has already aligned with Alberta, Ontario and Saskatchewan outcomes and they’re posted on our website Here.

In the evenings, we have a place selected for people to meet, eat, and socialize with our SPARK staff. While it’s definitely about having fun in the sun in San Diego and meeting new friends, SPARK Institutes are designed so each person receives the best possible physical education workshop — and learns SPARK’s unique content and instructional methodology. Our specially selected, fantastic trainers (this week it was Courtney Sjoerdsma and Ken McFadden for K-2; Julie Green and Joan Gillem for 3-6) inspire and motivate everyone, often taking the skeptical and converting them into our most enthusiastic advocates. And, each person leaves with a thorough understanding of SPARK and all training, materials, and support they need to begin “practicing” the craft with their students right away.

We encourage these newly formed professional families to stay in touch with us and one another, and we facilitate that via email distribution lists, our monthly e-newsletter, and the opportunity to visit SPARK again for another Institute in the future. For the people that attended the Level I K-2 and 3-6 last week, they’re ready now for Level II Institute next year, or whenever they’re ready to see us again.

If YOU haven’t attended a SPARK Institute yet, I highly recommend it. I don’t know anyone who didn’t think it was a terrific experience and well worth their time and money.
Hope to see YOU in San Diego next year!

–By Paul Rosengard

These articles are posted on the following website: http://www.sparkprograms.blogspot.com

 

 



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Fun 5 Email Newsletter: August 2009

Written by Kahoomiki on August 12th, 2009

Whatcha Eatin’?

by Elizabeth Saunders, FSHN student at UH Manoa
 
In an effort to keep better track of our energy and nutrient intake, many of us are making a special point to read food labels and take note of what we are choosing to put into our bodies. In addition to looking at labels, some people even keep food diaries for days or weeks at a time to get an “over-all” viewpoint of their diets.

What happens when the food you’re eating doesn’t have a label? Maybe you’re making an apple crisp from scratch and don’t know how many calories are in the five apples you used; or how much protein is in the spam musubi you bought at the 7-11 around the corner from your house. Never fear, the internet has yet another tool to satisfy your hunger for information. Several websites offer nutrition information on foods that do and don’t have labels.

The USDA Nutrient Data Laboratory which can be accessed at http://www.nal.usda.gov/fnic/foodcomp/search/ is one online option you have. Simply enter the food you are seeking information on in the “Keyword(s)” box and then use the dropdown box in “Select Food Group” to choose the option that best suits the type of food you are looking for. For instance, if you wanted to know the nutrition information for the apples in that apple crisp recipe, you would enter “apples” into the keyword box, and then choose “Fruits and Fruit Juices” from the dropdown box.

Now, if you were looking for the information on that spam musubi, you’re not going to find it at the USDA website. You will, however, find that information is at the Hawai`i Foods website accessed at http://hawaiifoods.hawaii.edu/index.asp. Hawai`i Foods is a great source of nutrition information for “local fare” that may difficult to find elsewhere. You can even find local style recipes with the nutrition information already figured out for you.

Take advantage of the opportunity to learn more about the foods that you eat. The information you seek is at your fingertips!

Image courtesy of www.ukumillion.com


Get Up, Get Out and Go!

by Rhoda Castillo

Diet is very important to a healthy body, but what’s also equally important is physical activity and exercise. Here in Hawaii we are blessed with such beautiful land and weather, so why not make use of our resources, get up, get out and go!

One way to get your body moving is to hang out at the beach. Our islands are surrounded with magnificent beaches and parks. You can take your kids, pets, or just yourself and take a run or jog around the park. Then afterwards you can cool down by treating yourself to a refreshing swim at the beach.

Hiking is another great way to get fit. I personally love going on hikes, especially with my dog and another friend. Our islands are packed with amazing hikes ranging from short and easy ones to long and rough ones. Hiking gets your muscles working and most hikes have spectacular views waiting for you at the end.

There are so many outdoor activities to do here in Hawaii that can help your endorphins going. But, if your days are too busy there are also simple things you can do that don’t take very much time at all. Going up and down the stairs instead of using the elevator or escalator really does make a difference. Parking further away from your destination also helps you get more steps out of your daily walking. Although these may seem too simple to make an impact on your health and wellbeing, doing them on a regular basis will definitely bump you up on your level of physical activity.

 


It was 20 years ago today!

Wednesday, July 22, 2009
 
In August 1989 the SPARK study began, with funding from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. Our goal was to create a national model of physical education designed to respond to children’s health needs. We wanted to not only get kids active, but “turn them on” to activity and build the physical and behavior-change competencies they needed to remain active and healthy.

Twenty years later, I can say we succeeded beyond my wildest expectations! The SPARK and M-SPAN studies provided some of the evidence that led The Community Guide to strongly recommend enhanced physical education as an evidence-based intervention. We now have a suite of physical activity and school health programs to help young people remain active. There is a network of talented trainers across the country that provides hundreds of enthusiastically-received trainings every year. We have shown that when teachers learn to use SPARK, they keep using it for years. Most importantly, well over 1 million children benefit from SPARK every day. I often say SPARK is the most fulfilling experience of my career.

Of course, I was just a catalyst for what SPARK has become. Thom McKenzie is the architect who built a fabulous program. Paul Rosengard is the mastermind behind the blossoming of SPARK into a powerful force for improving health throughout the nation (and hopefully, soon, the world). It is a rare combination of skills to go from being an award-winning coach to a PE innovator to directing the phenomenal growth of SPARK, while maintaining quality and our strong reputation the whole time.

Recently, the SPARK staff and the master trainers got together to celebrate SPARK’s 20th birthday. It was a special occasion for me for many reasons. I really enjoyed paying tribute to Thom, Paul, and all the fabulous staff. It was a special treat to recognize SPARK employee numero uno, Kecia Carrasco. She was number one then, and she is number one now. We are all blessed that she is still devoting her considerable talents to SPARK. And it wouldn’t have been a SPARK party without a lot of fun activities. The master trainers led us in 3 great dances under the California sun, and I hope you get a chance to see some of the video.

With all that the SPARK team has accomplished, it is not nearly enough. While SPARK was growing, so was the obesity epidemic. It is very fortunate that we created some solutions for this problem, because concern about childhood obesity is certainly driving much of the interest in what we can provide. But still most schools do not have evidence-based activity-focused physical education. Most after-school, preschool, and recreation programs are not active enough. We have much more to do. But “with a little help from our friends” we will “come together” and SPARK the “revolution” that is needed to get every child active so they can be healthier and happier.

Jim Sallis
www.drjamessallis.sdsu.edu
 
SPARK

eNewsletter – www.sparkpe.org/newsletterForm.jsp
Webinars – www.sparkpe.org/wed_web.jsp
Blog – www.sparkprograms.blogspot.com
 


Please visit the Kaho’omiki Website for Fun 5 Updates, http://kahoomiki.org/

 

 



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Fun 5 Email Newsletter: July 2009

Written by Kahoomiki on July 8th, 2009

Calcium

By Amy Webb

Calcium is essential for the development of bone and teeth. Recommended Adequate Intake levels for calcium are set by age: 1 to 3 year olds need 500 mg/day; 4 to 8 year olds need 800 mg/day; 9 to 13 year olds need 1300 mg/day; 14 to 18 year olds need 1300 mg/day; 19 to 50 year olds need 1000 mg/day. The current food guide pyramid recommends every one over the age of 2 consume 2-3 servings of dairy products daily. It is easy to consume a serving of dairy with every meal. Here are a few suggestions:

Breakfast: Pour 1 cup of low-fat milk over cereal; cook oatmeal or cream of wheat with milk instead of water; have 8 oz. of yogurt; have 1 cup calcium fortified orange juice.

Lunch: Make a fruit smoothie with 1 cup of milk; eat a grilled cheese sandwich with 2 oz. of American cheese; put 1.5 oz cheese in a green salad.

Dinner: Enjoy 1 cup of milk; top baked potatoes with cheese; have ice cream for dessert.
Kale, broccoli, and spinach are also good sources of calcium.

For more information check out: http://www.nal.usda.gov/fnic/Fpyr/pyramid.html

Image Source: http://images.teamsugar.com/files/users/1/12981/12_2007/calcium_foods.jpg


Fabulous Fruits

Fruits provide vital nutrients like dietary fiber, vitamin C, potassium and folate that are important for your health. I love to eat fruits, but after a while I tend to get bored of eating them the same plain old way all the time. If you’re like me, you need new fun and easy ways to consume your recommended 2 cups of fruit daily. Two ways to do this are by making fruit kabobs with a yogurt dip or by making a fruit sorbet.

Fruit Kabobs with Yogurt Dip

Ingredients:
-Fruits of your choice (such as berries, apples, kiwi, pineapple, oranges, banana)
-1 6- or 8-ounce container of fruit yogurt
-1 to 2 tablespoons of lowfat whipped topping

Directions:
-Wash hands thoroughly
-Wash fruits with cold running water
-Peel and/or cut fruits into wedges or small chunks
-Thread fruits on skewers and arrange on a platter
-Mix together the fruit yogurt and the whipped topping and pour into a small bowl

Tips:
To serve as an appetizer for a party/gathering, thread fruits on toothpicks. To keep fruits that turn dark looking fresh, quickly dip them into something acidic like pineapple juice after cutting.

 

Refreshing Fruit Sorbet

Ingredients:
-1 cup of your favorite (or any) frozen fruit
-2 to 3 tablespoons water (or fruit juice, or a liqueur)

Directions:
-Add ingredients to a blender and blend
-Add more frozen fruit or water to reach your ideal consistency
-Blend until smooth

Tips:
For a more fancy looking dessert or for parties, use a variety of frozen fruits and pour into cocktail glasses. This will add more flavors and a beautiful contrasting display of colors in the same glass.

Also check out http://www.mypyramid.gov/pyramid/fruits_why.html for more helpful information regarding the health benefits of fruits.

 


Do You Live in a Healthy Neighborhood?

I was recently asked to propose a short list of indicators of a “healthy neighborhood.” The list was to be considered by the San Diego Childhood Obesity Initiative, which is a wonderful coalition working hard to improve environments and policies to support children’s health. I thought others might be interested in the list, so I am sharing it here.

The items represent my understanding of likely physical or built environmental influences on diet, physical activity, and sedentary behaviors. Many of the items are consistent with evidence. I believe the general concepts are sound, but the specific numbers and distances are best guesses. For present purposes I added a few priority indicators for healthy schools and homes.

Healthy food access

  • Supermarket or other source of affordable fresh fruits and vegetables within ½ mile of homes
  • No more than 2 convenience or liquor stores within ½ mile of homes
  • No more fast food than sit-down restaurants within ½ mile of homes
  • Community garden within 1 mile of homes
  • Weekly farmer’s market within 1 mile of homes

 

Facilities for active recreation

  • Park with play equipment in good working order within ½ mile of homes
  • Parks have walking paths
  • Daily youth activity programs for free or sliding scale fees in all parks
  • Private recreation facility with sliding scale fees within ½ mile of homes
  • Nearest school activity facilities is open for public use

 

Designing for active transport

  • Sidewalks on every street in neighborhood
  • Pedestrian aids (crosswalks, signal) at intersection with nearest busy street
  • Street pattern creates direct routes from homes to nearby destinations
  • Nearest shopping area has sidewalks and safe pedestrian crossings
  • Public transit stop within ½ mile of homes

 

Healthy school environments

  • Evidence-based physical education offered daily
  • Markings on preschool and elementary playgrounds to stimulate active play
  • Sidewalks, marked crosswalks, and traffic calming within ¼ mile of each school to facilitate safe walking and biking
  • Salad bars with multiple raw food choices daily in every cafeteria
  • Only healthy foods provided at school
  • Convenience stores and fast food restaurants are not within ¼ mile of schools
  • No food advertising in schools

 

Healthy home environments

  • No televisions in children’s bedrooms
  • Only healthy foods out on the counter for snacking
  • Sports and activity supplies available for both indoor and outdoor play
  • A bicycle or skateboard for every child

 

James Sallis
www.drjamessallis.sdsu.edu

eNewsletter – www.sparkpe.org/newsletterForm.jsp
Webinars – www.sparkpe.org/wed_web.jsp
Blog – www.sparkprograms.blogspot.com

 

 



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Fun 5 Email Newsletter: June 2009

Written by Kahoomiki on June 4th, 2009

Good to the Bone!

By Elizabeth Saunders, FSHN student at UH Manoa

Osteoporosis, or “porous bones”, is a disease in which bones have lost the density which gives them their fortitude. This asymptomatic disease may not be realized until a fractured or broken bone occurs. There is no cure for osteoporosis so prevention is the key.

Bone health is something that is often not thought about until older age when the threat of osteoporosis looms near. However, bone health is developed from an early age, and peak bone mass is achieved in early adult years. This means it is imperative to supply the bones with adequate nutrients, namely calcium, throughout youth and on into your older years. Calcium has many important functions in the body, other than providing structure and density to the bones. In fact, if calcium intake from the diet is inadequate, the body will steal calcium from the bones in order to supply it the heart, muscles, nerves and blood; a process known as reabsorption which can contribute to the development of osteoporosis.

The most common sources of calcium in the diet are dairy products such as milk, cheese, and yogurt. Many foods and beverages are also fortified with calcium which is a helpful way for those who are lactose intolerant to increase their calcium intake. Look for calcium fortified cereals, orange juice, soy milk, and even water.

Calcium is not the only key to prevention of osteoporosis. To find out what else you can do to keep your bones healthy and determine your own personal risk factors, visit the link below:

http://www.nof.org/osteoporosis/diseasefacts.htm

For information about you or your loved ones dietary calcium needs, visit the link below:

http://www.webmd.com/osteoporosis/taking-calcium-for-osteoporosis

Sources: National Osteoporosis Foundation at http://www.nof.org/

Images courtesy of
http://www.alpslabs.com
http://oregonstate.edu/dept/foodsci/dairy

 


What Kid is a Vegetable Fan?

By Dustin Chang

I know I wasn’t when I was younger, and I’m not exactly the biggest fan of them now to be honest, or at least not all of them. There’s something discouraging about seeing a kid pick apart their food with their forks, separating all the stuff they want to eat with all of the stuff they don’t want to eat, namely the green stuff. But we all know how important vegetables are in providing not only fiber, but various antioxidants and phytochemicals which have numerous health benefits. So how do we get more vegetables into our kids?

Replacing various cooking liquids with vegetable juice is a very “tasteful” strategy. When cooking stews and soups, most recipes will call for water to be the cooking liquid. Why not replace something with no flavor with something that has a lot of it? One of my favorite things to cook is a good heaping pot of chili. But instead of using water as the stewing liquid as most recipes call for, I find myself using the hot and spicy version of a certain brand of vegetable juice to not only increase the vegetable content of my stew, but add an additional “kick” to it as well.

Here’s a simple version:

V8® 7-Ingredient Chili

Prep:M 10 minutes
Cook: 25 minutes
Serves: 6

Ingredients:
2 lb. ground turkey
1 large onion, chopped (about 1 cup)
2 tbsp. chili powder
1/2 tsp. ground cumin
3 1/2 cups V8® 100% Vegetable Juice (Regular or Low Sodium)
1 small green pepper, chopped (about 1/2 cup)
2 cans (about 15 ounces each) red kidney beans, rinsed and drained

Directions:
Cook the turkey, onion, chili powder and cumin in a 4-quart saucepan over medium-high heat until the turkey is well browned, stirring often.

Add the vegetable juice, pepper and beans to the saucepan and heat to a boil. Reduce the heat to low. Cover and cook for 15 minutes or until the vegetables are tender.

Serving Suggestion: Serve baked potatoes with sour cream and chives. For dessert serve fresh apple slices.

Source: V8-V8® 7-Ingredient Chili. 2009. Available at: http://www.v8juice.com/RecipeDetail.aspx?recipeId=24874&catId=851. Accessed May 25, 2009.

 


Wednesday, May 6, 2009

Where does PE fit within our schools? (Part One)

Physical education is at the intersection of at least three major academic thoroughfares. PE has roots in exercise and sports science and represents a primary means of applying the science. PE is itself a pedagogical field and is practiced within educational systems. The public health field claims PE as a health intervention that is of increasing value due to the childhood obesity epidemic. Major intersections are often centers of culture and commerce, but the turf surrounding PE is often contested.

These are my personal observations of how the various fields view PE, though they are necessarily over-generalized. Over the decades PE programs in universities have split from exercise science departments because they could not reconcile the science and application missions. This may not be too unfortunate, because neither the scientists nor the PE practitioners tried too hard to bridge the gap between science and practice. Because all states have some kind of school physical education requirements, education departments in universities and state governments have no choice but to accommodate PE. However, there is a notable lack of enthusiasm for PE on the part of the education establishment. The federal Department of Education provides little leadership or support for PE. Many state education departments refuse to hire a physical education coordinator. After 100 years in the schools, PE is not considered a core subject and education departments remain unsure what to do with PE. The percentage of students taking PE has declined in recent years.

In my view, of the three disciplines, public health has the highest level of interest in PE, because it is part of coordinated school health and physical activity has many physical and mental health benefits. The obesity epidemic has only heightened interest in PE, because obesity is seen as a crisis needing urgent attention. But public health’s interests in PE are often not reciprocated. PE professionals seem much more interested in gaining status as a core academic discipline than in ensuring PE is optimized to benefit children’s health. Is it possible for PE to improve its status within education while improving children’s health? I will touch on this in my next entry.

James Sallis
www.drjamessallis.sdsu.edu


Wednesday, May 13, 2009

Where does PE fit within our schools? (Part Two)

Can PE contribute optimally to both educational and health goals? There is a clear illustration that public health’s priorities for PE are not shared in the PE field. The public health concern is that PE is the only required time for physical activity that affects almost all students on a regular basis. Remember that almost all of the school day is enforced sitting. It is essential to ensure that opportunity for activity and health promotion is not missed. The Healthy People health promotion objectives for the US adopted a goal that at least 50% of PE class time would be spent in moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA). Everyone is aware that “PE is more than just physical activity,” but the objective does not require that PE would be reduced to exercise programs where students run all the time. Active learning, less-active skill drills, game play, and some didactics would seem to fit comfortably in classes that are at least 50% active. But studies show 50% MVPA requires planning, and often training and an appropriate curriculum. Major studies funded by NIH, such as SPARK, CATCH, LEAP, and TAAG showed that activity levels can be raised in elementary, middle, and high schools, so the 50% MVPA is realistic and evidence-based.

The 50% MVPA objective was announced in 1990, repeated in 2000, and is likely to remain in the 2010 editions of Healthy People. CDC’s Community Guide recommends “enhanced” or highly active PE as an evidence-based intervention to promote physical activity. The public health community is strong in its support for PE. However, to my knowledge, no state education department, no PE professional organization, and no school district has adopted the 50% MVPA objective as a requirement or official goal.

This situation demonstrates the need for ongoing dialog between education and health departments at the national, state, and local levels, to work together to achieve multiple aims through excellent PE. Because improved PE would benefit health, perhaps part of PE’s funding should come from the health sector. There are several examples of this approach being effective, so it is a model that could be expanded.

James Sallis
www.drjamessallis.sdsu.edu

 

 



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Fun 5 Email Newsletter: May 2009

Written by Kahoomiki on April 30th, 2009

Hello Fun 5 Enthusiasts.

I would like to highlight the career of a person dedicated to making the Fun 5 program a success. Paula Adams is originally from Argentina and she is the Fun 5 Program Manager. Ms. Adams completed her Master’s degree in Psychology and was an Instructor before relocating to the United States.

She began her professional career as a Psychotherapist in a Mental Health Clinic in New York City and she helped research “Behavior change in suicidal adolescents” for Columbia Presbyterian Hospital. She has researched, published, and presented numerous articles. Kaho’omiki is fortunate that her husband accepted a position at Punahou because the transition brought Ms. Adams to Honolulu, Hawaii.

Her background in adolescent studies has proven to be a rewarding experience and benefits the Fun 5 program mission. Ms. Adams was the Fun 5 Program Coordinator with the University of Hawaii at Manoa for the last three years, but she recently joined Kaho’omiki to run the Fun 5 program as the Program Manager.

Paula Adams is married with two kids. She has a daughter named Sofia who is 10 years old and a son named Timmy, who is 6 years old. Ms. Adams says she enjoys being with her family and friends. She is physically active in many sports: hiking, running, yoga, and she ran the Honolulu and Hilo marathon twice.

According to Ms. Adams, she would like to see the Fun 5 program sustain for years to come and she intends to encourage a Fun 5 Program that continues to promote kids to be physically active and nutritious by making healthy choices in their selection of foods.

Kaho’omiki is proud to spotlight a Fun 5 Superstar and we look forward to a bright Fun 5 Future. If you have questions about the Fun 5 program, please do not hesitate to contact Paula Adams. She may be reached at (800) 581-7491, Ext. 20 or by email at padams@kahoomiki.org.

Thank you Fun 5!

Best Regards,
Steven Lorick
Executive Director
Kaho’omiki


Boosting Nutrients

Get tips on beefing up the nutritional content of your children’s meals from Suzannah Olivier, author of Healthy Food for Happy Kids

In the real world (in which we live!) kids are not going to choose their foods to be perfectly balanced nutritionally. So it helps to have a few ideas up your sleeve to make sure that the content of their meals can be enhanced.

  • Add extra vegetables or fruits to recipes at every opportunity or serve as side dishes.
  • When you offer a sweet or chocolate for a snack your child is missing out on the opportunity to eat something that has real nutritional value, such as yoghurt, a small sandwich or some fruit. One way round this is to automatically include these as part of a snack. So offer a cube or two of chocolate alongside a few slices of fruit, or a few crisps with a small sandwich square. This way you avoid the issue of ‘deprivation’ yet at the same time ensure that there is some balance to the snack.
  • A child who is hungry may be more amenable to eating something healthy, so this may be the best time to offer some vegetable soup to start a meal, or some crudités or salad to munch on while he or she is waiting for the rest of the meal.
  • Sneak vegetables into a dish. Vegetables on a plate might be passed over, whereas vegetable or lentil soup, or a vegetable based sauce on pasta may be enjoyed.
  • As your child becomes more independent and eats away from home instill one thing into him: to choose just one portion of fruit or a vegetable with each meal. This is the minimum to ensure good health and by keeping the message simple you have a greater chance of it being adhered to.
  • Learn to adapt recipes to improve their nutritional content. Many recipes will tolerate having half the flour substituted with whole meal flour or other grains such as ground oats or buckwheat – it is just a question of experimentation. You can also usually get away with reducing the amount of sugar in a baking recipe by one-third without affecting the quality.
  • Replace some sugar with chopped or pureed dried fruit such as dates or raisins, which give good levels of fiber, minerals and antioxidants. You can also add chopped or ground seeds to both savory and sweet dishes to add a nutty flavor and boost the essential fatty acid, mineral and fiber levels.

Source: ivillage.co.uk.Boosting Nutrients

http://www.ivillage.co.uk/print/0,9688,617063,00.html

April 24, 2009

Submitted by Grace Lam


Sports Nutrition- The Basics of What to Eat to Improve Performance and Optimize Recovery

By Neeva Lemmel-Duerr

Deciding what to eat and how much when you exercise is complicated. Nutrient needs vary from person to person, and have to do with size, metabolic rate, health concerns and other individual factors. However, there are some basic guidelines which can be applied across the board in order to optimize the health benefits of any sports activity.

Daily caloric intake depends on your caloric expenditure, which has to do with the type of exercise you do and the length of each session. In addition, deciding how many calories to consume daily depends on your goal and differs for someone trying to lose weight, gain weight, train for a sports event and so on. It is recommended that you eat a well balanced diet rich in all major nutrients and all the required vitamins regardless of your goal. As a general rule, it is not wise to deprive your body of carbohydrates, for example, or survive on very restricted calories. This is especially true when you add exercise to your routine, as your body will be depleting stored glycogen, fat and other nutrients which should be replenished through food consumption.

Eating a “clean” diet, low in processed foods and high in fresh fruit and vegetables, healthy fats, grains and protein is the key. A good idea is to eat frequently- between 4 and 6 mini-meals a day, each consisting of complex carbohydrates and an equal portion of fats and proteins. Eating frequently will help you avoid feeling hungry and should rev up your metabolism. In order to build a daily menu, you should divide the number of calories you need to consume per day into the number of desired meals.

Before engaging in your sports activity, you should drink water. It is recommended that you drink a glass of water an hour before the activity, drink during the activity and then again at the end of your session. If you engage in an endurance event, like a marathon or a triathlon, you should probably consume an electrolyte containing sports beverage. Increasing your carbohydrate intake in the last meal before the event would allow your body to store extra glycogen, but this is not a necessary practice if you only engage in a short duration exercise session.

During your exercise session, it is important to keep hydrating your body. once again, a sports drink or nutrition bar are only necessary if you engage in extremely high intensity or long duration event. Otherwise, drinking water every 15 minutes will suffice.

At the end of your exercise session you should opt for drinking water and consuming a meal rich in carbohydrates and protein. Carbohydrates are required to replenish the glycogen stores from your muscles and liver that were used up. Protein is needed to repair muscle tissue that is damaged during exercise. Try to consume a meal consisting of three to four times the amount of carbohydrates to protein about one to two hours after your activity. Water should be replenished sooner- right after the end of your session.

Finally, you should always listen to your body while engaging in different sports activities. If you feel thirst or hunger, it is likely that you need to hydrate or eat. You should consult your physician if you suffer from a disease or disorder that may require special nutritional guidelines. Do not over exert yourself- remember that fitness is not achieved through periodical bouts of extreme activity, but rather built gradually.

If you use the above guidelines to enhance your individual exercise and nutrition routine, you will surely see an improvement in both your performance during exercise sessions and your recovery at their end.



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Fun 5 Email Newsletter: April 2009

Written by Kahoomiki on April 8th, 2009

Nutritious Recipes That Your Kids Will Love

By Bethany Sumida

Some of my favorite foods growing up were chicken salad sandwiches, French fries, and chicken noodle soup. These may be some of your kids’ favorites, too. If they are, these three recipes can make these classic dishes more well-balanced and nutritious by adding more fiber and veggies and reducing saturated fat.

Chicken Salad Rolls

chicken salad rolls

Ingredients

  • 1 cup shredded, cooked chicken
  • 1/3 cup “something crunchy” (celery, apple, radish, sweet pickle slices or a combo)
  • “Something oniony,” like 1 scallion or 1/4 small red onion, chopped
  • 1/4 cup mayonnaise or plain yogurt
    Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 2 whole-wheat hot dog buns
 

Directions

  1. Stir chicken, the “something crunchy,” “something oniony,” and mayonnaise or yogurt together until evenly coated. Season with salt and pepper, to taste. (This can be made the night before, and refrigerated.)
  2. Evenly fill the hot dog buns with the salad mix. Wrap in parchment or butcher paper. Pack in a lunch sack with an ice pack and send off to school.

Cook’s Note: Roasted turkey is great in these as well. Or, for adventurous eaters, make it curried: Stir 2 teaspoons curry powder, 1/3 cup chopped fresh cilantro and 1/4 cup golden raisins into the mix.

Makes 2 Servings

Source

Food Network. Chicken Salad Rolls. 2008. Available at: http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/food-network-kitchens/chicken-salad-rolls-recipe/index.html. Accessed March 22, 2009.

 

Oven “Fries”

oven fries

Coated with olive oil and baked in a hot oven, these fries are soft and buttery inside and crisp on the outside—the perfect combination.

 

Ingredients

  • 2 large Yukon Gold potatoes, cut into wedges
  • 4 teaspoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried thyme (optional)

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 450°F.
  2. Toss potato wedges with oil, salt and thyme (if using). Spread the wedges out on a rimmed baking sheet.
  3. Bake until browned and tender, turning once, about 20 minutes total.

Makes 4 Servings

Source

Eating Well. Recipes: Oven “Fries”. 1993. Available at: http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/oven_fries.html. Accessed March 22, 2009.

 

Vegetable Noodle Soup

vegetable noodle soup

 

Ingredients

  • 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 rib celery, sliced (about 1 cup)
  • 1 medium carrot, sliced (about 3/4 cup)
  • 1 clove garlic, smashed
  • 1/4 medium onion, about 1/2 cup
  • 1/4 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1/3 cup orzo or other small pasta or egg noodles or broken up spaghetti
  • 4 cups low-sodium chicken broth (1 quart box, or 2 cans)
  • Small handful fresh parsley leaves, basil or dill, chopped (about 2 tablespoons)
  • 1/2 lemon, juiced (about 1 tablespoon)
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • Serving suggestion: Whole-wheat crackers and cheese sticks

Directions

  1. Heat the olive oil in a medium saucepan over medium heat; add all the vegetables, garlic and onion. Season with the salt, and cook until tender, about 6 minutes. Add the pasta and cook until slightly toasted and golden, about 2 minutes. Add broth, and bring to a boil over high heat. Cook, covered, until pasta is just tender, about 8 minutes.
  2. Stir in whatever herb suits you (or your young eater) and lemon juice. Season with pepper and additional salt, to taste. Fill thermos, pack in a lunch sack with crackers and cheese sticks and send off to school.
  3. TIP: This soup freezes well, so freeze any leftovers or make a double batch to have plenty on hand. Also, you can stir in some cooked chicken or mini-meatballs, if desired, for another meal.

Makes 4 Servings

Source

Food Network. Vegetable Noodle Soup. 2008. Available at: http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/food-network-kitchens/vegetable-noodle-soup-recipe/index.html. Accessed March 22, 2009.


Eat Fish for your Brain

By Mai Fujii

People like to eat hamburgers, steaks, and hot dogs. What about fish? Fish contain omega-3 fatty acids that are said to be “a good fat”. It is recommended to eat more fish for your benefit. Here is an explanation of why fish is good for you.

 

What are Omega-3 fatty acids?

Omega-3 fatty acids are considered essential fatty acids. They are essential to human health but cannot be manufactured by the body. For this reason, omega-3 fatty acids must be obtained from food.

Why is it good for our health?

Omega-3 fatty acids play a crucial role in brain function as well as normal growth and development. In addition, omega-3 fatty acids reduce inflammation and help prevent risk factors associated with chronic diseases such as heart disease, cancer, and arthritis.

 

What are good sources of omega-3 fatty acids?

The American Heart Association recommends eating fish (particularly fatty fish such as mackerel, lake trout, herring, sardines, albacore tuna, and salmon) at least 2 times a week.

Is there any concern eating fish?

It is advised that pregnant women and mothers, nursing mothers, young children, and women who might become pregnant not eat several types of fish, including swordfish, shark, and king mackerel. These individuals should also limit consumption of other fish, including albacore tuna, salmon, and herring. They can take omega-3 fatty acids in quality dietary supplements that are certified mercury-free by a reputable third-party lab.

Need a recipe? Try this!
Cracked pepper salmon

  1. Take 2 tablespoons of cracked black pepper, 1 tablespoon of Italian seasoning, ½ teaspoon of salt and ¼ teaspoon of garlic powder and mix them in a small bowl.
  2. Now, take four 6-ounce salmon fillets (make sure, they are not too thick, because then they cook more evenly), rub the fillets with the mixture you prepared before and dredge them in flour (2 – 4 tablespoons should do).
  3. Finally, pour about 1 tablespoon of canola oil into a large skillet over medium-high heat, add the salmon fillets and cook them for about 4 minutes on each side.

Below you find some additional nutritional information (for 1 fillet):

  • Omega 3′s: ALA: 1 g ; EPA: 1 g ; DHA: 2 g
  • Omega 6: 2 g
  • Fat: 14.5 g
  • Carbohydrate: 6.5 g
  • Protein: 34.5 g
  • Calories: 300 kcal

Written by Mai Fujii, FSHN student at UH Manoa

Sources: 2008 University of Maryland Medical Center (UMMC). http://www.umm.edu/altmed/articles/omega-3-000316.htm

Your guide to Omega 3. http://www.omega3-foods.info/omega-3-recipes/omega-3-recipes.html



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Fun 5 Email Newsletter: February–March 2009

Written by Kahoomiki on February 27th, 2009

Three Rules for Healthy Eating

By Dr. William Sears

fruitsDeciding what’s for dinner (or breakfast, lunch, or snack) has never been more challenging. With childhood obesity, diabetes, and other food-related ailments in the news almost daily, you may wonder what you can feed your kids. The simple truth is, if you stock your pantry and fridge mostly with healthy options, you won’t have to think about it as much — and your children just might learn to love what’s good for them. Here, three food rules I recommend in my practice and live by with my own kids. They can help you build healthy eating habits for your whole family:

Eat the right carbs

With carbohydrate-conscious diet books still on the best-seller lists, and a friend dropping five pounds in two weeks on a bread-free regimen; it’s easy to assume that banishing carbs is good for your family’s health. It’s not. Like fuel for a car, carbs provide energy for bodies and brains. Children especially need lots of carbs, even more so when they’re very active.

But alas, not all carbs are created equal. Kid staples like mac ‘n’ cheese, pizza, and cookies are filled with empty carbs: refined (white) flour and/or too much sugar. The extra calories from all that sugar are turned into body fat. Plus, because empty carbs have few nutrients to slow down digestion, they’re quickly converted to glucose. They rush through the bloodstream and stomach too fast, leaving kids feeling hungry again. And that can lead to overeating.

It sounds scary, but the trick with carbs is to make sure your child gets enough of the right kinds, and not too much of the wrong ones. An easy rule of thumb: The best carbs come packed with fiber and some protein, and are close to how nature made them. The more processed they are (lots of ingredients you can’t pronounce is a sign), the worse they are.

Good carbs:

  • Fruits and vegetables
  • Beans and lentils
  • Tofu
  • Whole grains
  • Natural peanut butter, for kids over 4
  • Low-fat milk and yogurt
  • Oatmeal

Contributing editor William Sears, M.D., is a dad of eight and coauthor of The Healthiest Kid in the Neighborhood, which will be published in September 2006 by Little, Brown and Company.

Src: Parenting.com. 2008. http://www.parenting.com/gear-article/Recipes/Finger-Foods/Three-Rules-for-Healthy-Eating#


Fruit juice vs. Fresh fruit

By Grace Lam

My professors always say there is no "good" or "bad" food in the nutrition point of view. Each food have their strength and weakness, we cannot say that fruit juice is "bad". However, most fruit juice in the market contains added sugar or preservative.

Even though it is freshly squeezed, in order to make one cup of juice, 3-4 fruits are needed. It makes up to 120kcal per cup, comparing to one fresh fruit which contains only 40kcal. Also vitamin such as vitamin C in the juice will oxidized and loss its function if not consume right away and dietary fiber may not be able to get into the juice and benefit our body.

Some parents think that their children don’t want to chew fruit, this may not be true. Children need more time to learn how to move their teeth and chew; parents should let them try different fruits and see which fruit they like the most. If you never let them try and give them fruit juice at the beginning, they will never know the "trick" of chewing. Try to educate your children that only new born baby or elderly without teeth will drink juice. Also parents should act as a model and teach their children to choose fruit with different color everyday.


A New Twist on an Old Favorite

By Elizabeth Saunders

Peanut butter and jelly sandwiches have been a lunchbox staple for as long as I can remember. These days, a lot of moms and dads are not only concerned with creating a delicious lunch, but one that is also nutritious.  Here are a few examples of how to boost the nutrition value of this lunchtime star:

  • Choose whole grain bread- The ingredient label should list “whole wheat”, “whole oats”, or some other whole grain as first.  If you don’t see the word “whole”, it’s not whole grain bread.  Whole grain breads typically have more fiber than breads made with refined flours.  Fiber helps to satisfy hunger without added calories.
  • Swap out jam or jelly for a banana- Jams and jellies may be loaded with added sugars or sweeteners and not much else. A banana, however, contains fiber and about 400 mg of potassium (Brown, p. 28).  Potassium aids in maintaining water balance in body tissues which is especially important in active kids (Brown, p. 24).
  • Scope out your options- While the standard may be peanut butter, it doesn’t have to be the rule.  There are several other nut options when it comes to a spread for sandwiches; almond, cashew, and even macadamia nut butters are available at many supermarkets.  However, tree nut allergies are a common allergy amongst children.  If your child is allergic to tree nuts, or your school is a “nut-free” school, here are some alternatives:
    • Soy nut butter
    • Sunflower seed butter
    • Pumpkin seed butter

These products can often be found at your local health food store if you can’t find them in your regular supermarket.  Just read the label to be sure the spread isn’t processed in a plant that processes tree nuts if allergies are an issue for your child or their school.
Tasty and convenient, these options are great alternatives to include in your child’s lunch or as a snack to share together.

Written by Elizabeth Saunders, FSHN student at UH Manoa
Sources: Brown, Judith E., Janet S. Isaacs, and U. Beate Krinke. Nutrition Through the Life


Hungry Kids?

by Amy Webb

Are your kids hungry when they get home from school? Don’t feed them a bag of chips or offer them some candy. Instead, try this healthy snack that they can make themselves! It has protein in it, to fill them up until dinner time; vitamins A and C; calcium; and iron. All things their growing bodies need! 

You’ll need:

4 Boston lettuce leaves
4 ounces thinly sliced cooked turkey breast
2 teaspoons honey mustard, or low-fat dressing
1 small tomato, sliced thinly

Place 1/2 ounce of turkey on each lettuce leaf, just below the center. Spread the dressing over the turkey.Top with a tomato slice.  Roll up, starting on the short side. Secure with a toothpick.

2 wraps = 1 serving
Makes 4 servings

Here is an exciting website to check out. It has lots of information on nutrition, fun activities, and yummy recipes geared toward children! Parents, look it over and then let your children explore it. 
http://www.nutritionexplorations.org/kids/nutrition-main.asp



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